Adolescent Literature

Banned Books and More…

For this week, a main focus was on banned books, book challenges, and self-censorship. For me, my comfort zone is very small. It does not take a lot for me to branch out but with that said, I rarely like to. My comfort zone consists of horror, fantasy, and realistic fiction. These are the books I am drawn to the most thus, they are the ones I read the most. As a reader, I believe it is important to set outside of the comfort zone because it allows us to expand and discover books that we have deemed uninteresting because of its genre. It only takes one book to open a world of new opportunities. From the “Dirty Little Secret” article, one quote I found very impactful. It says, “The truth is, no one ever really knows which books might end up changing a kid’s life, helping him find comfort, or gaining a better understanding of a subject.”

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As for having books on my shelf that I would be uncomfortable with, I could not really think of anything. I believe that controversial book serve some purpose or else they would not have been published. It can be controversial for students to read these books but it also gives them freedom to read what they please.

Banned and challenged books have always been interesting to me because most of the ones I read are banned for some reason or another. Banned books allow for controversial subject matter that can allow for a mind change within students. This can happen but banned books also allow for students to open their minds. If a student is from a small town with little diversity, controversial books allow them to see the reality for some kids their age. These can be things like different sexualities, gang violence, and like the book I am reading now, sex trafficking. It can be difficult for students to read but if they choose to, they can be helpful.

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Overall, I believe in having banned books in the classroom as an option for students to read. It can cause problems with parents but I think it is important to tell students what they are getting themselves into before they open the book. It is also important to put readers outside of their comfort zone. It only takes one book to change everything for a student and the more open they are, they better reading experience they can have.

Happy Reading!

All images are provided by Flicker.

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4 thoughts on “Banned Books and More…”

  1. ” If a student is from a small town with little diversity, controversial books allow them to see the reality for some kids their age. These can be things like different sexualities, gang violence, and like the book I am reading now, sex trafficking.” YES! What if one student, Rachel, is contemplating hurting themselves because they’re lonely and they open up a book that describes other people like them..and they stop? I really gained a whole new respect for librarians in this unit and their power to help.

    Liked by 1 person

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